5 Cool Things you can do with Moss

I love moss. It’s natures vivid green pillow of awesomeness. It can turn concrete walls and floors into a green wonderland. There’s just something about that puffy, green stuff that fascinates me.

I collected a bunch of bookmarks of cool moss-related things in my browser that Im gonna share with you now.
 

1. Moss Graffiti

Moss Graffiti is really easy to do. Essentially you just have to put a bit of beer, sugar and some garden moss in a blender and give it a good swirl. After that you can put the sticky, gooey mass on walls that are in the shadow and have a bit of moisture. The graffito should stay in the painted shape for a while before it takes over the wall. Here is a more detailed recipe. Another way of doing it is to take a pressure washer and carve a pattern or a picture in an existing patch of moss. Of course that involves destroying existing moss wich is a way the true moss afficionado should never choose.

 

2. Mossariums for your Desk


I just invented that term to describe little glass containers with a bit of moss in them to give your workplace a touch of much-needed green. They are really easy to make. You put a bit of charcoal and some ceramic balls from hydroculture plant pots in the bottom to soak up excess water. Then you grab a big, juicy slab of moss with some soil underneath it and put it in the container. I just made that one and uploaded the picture. I found a little piece of wood that was already overgrown with moss and put it in a 2€ IKEA vase. That took me about 15 minutes. With a bit of watering you will have a green little hobbit landscape on your desk. You can imagine little creatures settling this untouched piece of paradise and then play god by causing floods with your watering can. Still beats filling a damn spreadsheet with boring data.

 

3. Hanging Glass Terrarium


The one in the picture is made by artist Teresa Kesseler and can be bought on Etsy. If you happen to have a suitable glass-thingy to create one of those yourself make sure you think of putting some charcoal and ceramic balls in the bottom like I explained before.

 

4. Underwater Reverse Bonsai


This one was done by aquascaping-artist Filipe Oliveira and it’s an aquarium. Essentially he used a root of a small tree, turned it around and planted underwater moss on the little root-branches. If you visit his website you’ll find plenty of awesome bonsai/aquarium hybrids.

 

5. Mossy Interior Design

Now this is definitely something for the more advanced moss fetishists out there but it sure left me thinking where in my flat I could dig a hole in the ground to plant some moss. I found most of those pictures in a really neat blog from Poland. Rest assured I don´t understand a single word on it but who cares when looking at something that cool. Just see for yourself. I got most of those pictures from a polish blog that I don’t understand but I think the two pictures of the mossy carpet installation was part of a furniture expo in Milan, Italy.

I hope you liked my little compilation.

Oh. And before I forget. While looking for kewl moss stuff I found this:
behold the awesomeness of the mosscape
This is a picture of Robert Michael Pyle wearing a moss stola. Before my research for this post I had never heard of him. Apparently he is a lepidopterist with a Ph. D. from the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies at Yale University. A lepidopterist is someone who specializes in moths and butterflies. An occupation that should imply some forest-time every once in a while.

This is what Wikipedia had to say about him:

Robert Michael Pyle (born July 19, 1947 in Denver, Colorado) is a lepidopterist and author who has published twelve books and hundreds of papers, essays, stories and poems. He has a Ph.D. from the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies at Yale University. He founded the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation in 1974. His 1987 book Wintergreen describes the devastation caused by unrestrained logging in Washington’s Willapa Hills near his adopted home. His 1995 book Where Bigfoot Walks: Crossing the Dark Divide was the subject of a Guggenheim Fellowship. His other books include Sky Time in Grays River: Living for Keeps in a Forgotten Place, and Chasing Monarchs: Migrating with the Butterflies of Passage. In September 2010 he published Mariposa Road: The First Butterfly Big Year, chronicling his adventures across the continent in 2008 to view and document as many of the native butterflies as possible (similar to the birder’s big year).

As annoying the internet can be sometimes it never fails to surprise me with a random yet awesome discovery. I just ordered a copy of Wintergreen to see what Dr. Pyle is all about. Ill let you know…

Share to liberate more bees from the hive...

The shortest way to find some green...

Follow Me on Pinterest

About Felix

I'm German. I work as an online-PR strategist. I live in a city. I don't like living in a city. You want to talk about cabins, fly fishing, the outdoors or tell me how awesome I am? Then connect with Felix Kaindl on Google+.

2 Responses to 5 Cool Things you can do with Moss

  1. Amanda 14. März 2013 at 10:47 #

    I love the idea of using moss in my house. How often would I have to water it when I use it as a wall picture for example?

    I was thinking of buying a piece of drywall or something like that and put some moss graffiti on it. If this works indoor I would hang it on the wall like a picture.

    I like the moss man 😉

    Best regards from Spain

    Amanda

    • Felix 14. März 2013 at 10:56 #

      Hi Amanda,

      If you hang your mossy picture in a dark corner you should not have to water it too often. It all comes down to your humidity-levels. If the air in your room is rather dry then you have to spray it a bit more frequently.

      BTW: Make sure the material you buy to put the moss on is not very absorbant. Otherwise it will look weird after a while. Let me know how your project pans out. Ill be more than happy to put your pictures in this post as well.

      Best,

      Felix

Schreibe einen Kommentar